I wonder if this is based on any true story

4stars

When Tears Ran Dry – by Vivian Waring – Review

single_review

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The book reads like a memoir of sorts and what happens throughout much of the novel seemed quite lifelike to me; I guess if I were just handed the book without any further information I would not know fact from fiction. There is a little hint of paranormal stuff

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The book reads like a memoir of sorts and what happens throughout much of the novel seemed quite lifelike to me; I guess if I were just handed the book without any further information I would not know fact from fiction. There is a little hint of paranormal stuff (nothing overdone, and that is good because given the core themes explored in the story, adding too much of fantasy would cause unnecessary distraction) like “she could sense gran’pappa’s presence watching over her” but again many people report sensing such things in real life too!

Likewise, the author has an eye for details. Each character is portrayed using just about the right details; again the descriptions are not overdone but are enough to help you imagine that the person is right in front of you, or that you know him or her too well:

“Alistair’s dark, piercing eyes, his Clark Gable moustache and his swarthy complexion, established him as a sex symbol amongst his legion of devoted, female viewers, although I doubt if any one of them would have noticed his slight, but endearing tremor of adrenalin in his smooth, professionally controlled voice”

That the author has done her homework is evident in the way she portrayed the tragedy of war – and a lot of it is actually quite dark and bleak (no sugarcoating here). The aftermath is perhaps even more painful and the author certainly leaves no stone unturned to convey her sympathy for the victims (thankfully, none of it seemed propaganda stuff):

“Several malnourished, looking toddlers, sat with their thin legs jutting out between the rails. Their dark, sunken eyes followed me around the room.

It felt eerie being in a room full of babies that didn’t make a sound. Not even a hungry cry or a grizzle in protest. Maybe their tiny souls knew there was no point in complaining. No one was listening.”

Finally, the dialogs impressed me the most. The author has used colloquialisms and contractions as and when needed, rendering them very, very naturalistic:

“‘No problem, Madame. I find bag.’

The friendly attendant retrieved the unfilled forms.

I breathed a sigh of relief. That was easy.

‘You pay ten dollah?’ she asked with another smile.”

OR

” ‘Quick, ma chère. Hide the camera,’ she whispered.

‘Hide the camera? Where?’”

Only downside is that, I would say, a table of contents at the start would have been helpful, , given the length of the book. All in all, a nice and well-researched output on the part of the author.

Conclusion Rating
4 stars

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