Nice political fiction, but could have been better

4stars

Voice in the Wilderness (Against All Enemies Book 1) – by H. L. Wegley – Review

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The prologue actually gives you such a sudden jerk that you cannot help but read page after page. Just think for a minute: who would not want to read about a character whose basic moral fiber is built upon principles such as

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I rarely read political books – be it fiction or non-fiction, because they are usually preachy and somewhat dogmatic. Plus the subject does not interest me at all. However, this book is an exception. I am glad I got it for myself, after much hesitation of course. The prologue actually gives you such a sudden jerk that you cannot help but read page after page. Just think for a minute: who would not want to read about a character whose basic moral fiber is built upon principles such as:

“Abandon all morals and ethics. They are impediments to establishing the world as it should be.”

“Never let the media, or my enemies, focus on one “scandal” too long. Give them something even more egregious to discuss, an endless cascade of “scandals” so they can never catch up.”

Your guess is as good as mine; by the way the latter made me chuckle a bit. Speaking of humor, you would find plenty in it, mentionable among them being:

“The man howled when her vicious kick hit a vulnerable spot. He slumped forward, cursing.”

The author’s creativity does not end here of course. Each chapter begins with a short, intriguing subheading which really forces you to read the whole damn thing in order to satisfy your curiosity. Character development is pretty good, and the plot, as I said, is both intriguing and entertaining. The dialogs are good, because each word is carefully chosen and there is nothing that you would consider dispensable.

“Alexis sighed long and loud. “The second you catch that Banning girl, I want to know.”

“Certainly.”

“She comes from a long line of patriots, of which she may be the most extreme. Anyone like her, who has the potential to start an insurgency, should be considered a serious threat. Eliminate her and anyone else involved. Do you understand?”

“I understand.”

My only gripe, and that goes for the general premise too, is a little lack of subtlety. How about if the author had portrayed this in a more realistic way, making the antagonists (we know who) look even more sinister! I am reminded of an incident of not so distant past where bloggers were being hacked to death for writing seditious posts against the extremist Bangladeshi government, but the government’s approach toward tackling the problem was completely different – so guarded and understated that very few saw a pattern until several bloggers were killed in that manner (the government’s tool, in this case, was religious fundamentalists because quite coincidentally, all the bloggers happened to be atheists). There, any language criticizing the government amounts to sedition, but anyways, I am digressing.

Anyhow a pretty good book overall.

Conclusion Rating
4 stars

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