Well written fiction on global warming

4stars

Pi Day Doomsday – by JOHN PAUL CATER – Review

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The author has, without a doubt done his homework, for it shows in the book. The mad scientist villain is not your ordinary, regular stock villain character; he is no caricature. He certainly comes with multiple shades, plus a

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The author has, without a doubt done his homework, for it shows in the book. The mad scientist villain is not your ordinary, regular stock villain character; he is no caricature. He certainly comes with multiple shades, plus a sardonic sense of humor (“My dear Adam, welcome to your world,”). Besides being eccentric, he has memory issues, OCD etc., among other things:

“He bent over, hands on his knees, looking around trying to remember his plan. He knew his memory was going; years working with ionizing radiation assured that, so he had planned and rehearsed the day’s tasks in detail many times. He had to get it right.”

You certainly cannot help but sympathize with him every time he faces a misfortune and admire him for his dedication and perseverance even if they were for an unjust cause:

“Though it was only a four foot fall, it injured his leg and tore a six inch strip of rotting skin from his calf. Sand flew as he dusted himself off and climbed back on the pier. Pain from the open wound on his leg attacked his mind, shutting down his reasoning. He was nearly incapacitated now, sudden spasms and stabbing pains consuming his concentration, yet he continued on, fueled by his burning need for revenge.”

Such richly detailed and meticulously portrayed negative characters are scarcely found in indie sci-fi books, but this one is an exception.

The rest of the characters were ‘meh’. I found some of the dialogs a bit un-naturalistic; I believe people don’t really speak long dialogs like these in real life in one breath, and even if the author want these dialogs to be the way they are, introduction of shorter dialogs, followed by ‘action beats’ (say, the speaker is doing something while saying it) and more dialog – is a much more realistic approach:

“I just checked with the fellows down in maintenance. The clone is ready for your use, but the Exosuit’s still in repair. The sun sets at 1735 hours today, a little over five hours from now. Do you have time to make a dive? Possibly find Eve?”
“We have to go today. Not enough time tomorrow, Captain. We won’t need the suit today though, so that’s okay.”

OR

“If what the Captain says is true, that we have until three-fifty-five p.m. on the fourteenth, I don’t see a problem. Harper can pick it up, fly out, drop it, and return in two hours. That gives until about one-fifty-five to return it to the ship. We better start our dive early, like 0700, to give us a little slack time. There won’t be any penalties for being late, just a quick, painless death.”
“That’s a comforting thought, Chief,” he said, chuckling.
“Seriously, Marker, I want you to remember everything I’ve ever taught you. Keep one eye on Eve, one on me, and the other on your gauges; can’t go wrong that way.” He said, a wry smile covering his face.

The novel starts on a very tense note; you know that the city is going to be destroyed soon (“Both would detonate simultaneously, miles apart, forming a perfect mushroom-capped pi symbol in the sky; their internal fail-safe circuitry ensured the perfect synchronization”) and with a heavily beating, panting heart you hope that it does not go as planned, that one miracle saves the city for everyone.

This book is not my cup of tea but I am glad I gave it a go and despite its wordiness it did not disappoint. Editing is top-notch. I only hope we don’t have eccentric scientists like that in real life or we would be in deep trouble, ha ha. Recommended for those who prefer reading sci-fi books with some strong development in plot and character.

Conclusion Rating
4 stars

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