The sequel puts a fitting end to the Plague

5stars

Blackbeard’s Revenge (The Voyages of Queen Anne’s Revenge Book 2) – by Jeremy McLean – Review

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I had already read the previous book in this series so I was anticipating this sequel with great enthusiasm. It is quite obvious that the author has vastly improved on his writing skills since his first novel. He introduces a character in just one paragraph with such skill that you could actually feel the character's presence behind your back!

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I had already read the previous book in this series so I was anticipating this sequel with great enthusiasm. It is quite obvious that the author has vastly improved on his writing skills since his first novel. He introduces a character in just one paragraph with such skill that you could actually feel the character’s presence behind your back!

“A tall, well-built man sauntered up beside the helmsman, a distinctive snap sounding as he thrust his one wooden leg to the lumber of the ship. A pipe was in his mouth and he blew great puffs of smoke into the air, carried off by the rising winds. His dark, grungy, salt-and-pepper hair was held in by a tricorn hat and covered his wrinkled, piercing eyes. The hair did not cloud his vision as he peered at the clouds. The man let the sea air into his nostrils with an almost animal ferocity.”

There is really no complex imagery or figures of speech used in here that would take a student of English literature to decipher; the paragraph above is simply constructed yet achieves its purpose.

The captain’s opening statement is actually a humorous indication of the paranormal elements present in both the books, but even for a casual reader it would be hard to miss the humor in it:

“Aye, but she be a storm of man, not the Lord.”

The author continues the trend of molding the style and syntax of a character’s dialog according to his/her social position.

There is some paranormal romance thrown in for good measure too. Even if you had bought this book thinking that it is strictly historical fiction, you won’t complain if you read this paragraph and beyond:

“Despite Edward’s dark reverie, he could not help but be brought out of his gloom and into Anne’s light. Anne was as the form of an angel in front of Edward. Every second felt like eternity as if to accentuate the horribly long time Edward and Anne had been torn apart, and yet eternity was not enough.”

More humor follows. This one is so funny that I cannot help but share it:

“”I’m not lying, Henry. You don’t know me as well as you think. Run while you still can.”

Anne nodded, the three ignoring Edward’s pleas.”So what do you propose we do?” Anne questioned with one hand in the air, palm up.

“We force his hand.” Henry sat down on the stone, folding his legs to get comfortable.

Anne smiled and joined Henry, and Sam shrugged his shoulders and made a sarcastic comment before sitting as well. The three faced the cell, watching Edward with nonchalance bordering on indifference.

“What are you doing? You must make haste before the guards find you.”

The trio didn’t move an inch, their bodies and faces becoming as the stone in the prison itself.

Edward stood up. “I don’t want to go with you, don’t you see? We are no longer friends, comrades, or family.”

None responded despite the biting remarks Edward made.”

The plot was more interesting and more maturely handled compared to the first book. The ship being renamed is a fit (although unexpected) conclusion after all that had happened in the story. Recommended both for fans of fantasy and historical genre fiction.

Conclusion Rating
5 stars

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